How tech’s most powerful women faced down the pandemic

Leaders at Google, Amazon, and Best Buy moved to safeguard workers and shore up struggling businesses.

How tech’s most powerful women faced down the pandemic

This is the web rendition of Data Sheet, Fortune's every day pamphlet on the top tech news. To get it conveyed every day to your in-take care of, join here. For the 2020 manifestation of Fortune's Most Powerful Women in Business list, the rules have changed to some degree. As the pandemic and the fights after George Floyd's passing have clarified, major issues should be tended to in the public eye. Include environmental change and the #MeToo development, and the time had come to add another measurement to the MPW choice cycle. As Fortune's Kristen Bellstrom and Beth Kowitt, who lead the task, clarify: "Basically, 2020 is the year when we said a last farewell to nothing new… We needed to see how a chief is using her influence. At this time of emergency and vulnerability, would she say she is utilizing her impact to shape her organization and the more extensive world to improve things?" How has that changed the rundown? Generally, 2020 has focused a cruel light on the tech business' failings, regardless of whether in halting the spread of harmful deception or advancing rivalry in new business sectors. Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, Oracle CEO Safra Catz, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, and Microsoft CFO Amy Hood all slipped from their 2019 rankings. In any case, Google CFO Ruth Porat, Best Buy CEO Corie Barry, AMD CEO Lisa Su, and Deirdre O'Brien, Apple's SVP of retail and individuals, climbed. Porat gets kudos for administering Google's pandemic reaction, including an independent venture help program. Barry dealt with a huge online deals blast, and keeping in mind that Best Buy at first furloughed a large portion of the organization's low maintenance and hourly specialists, it paid them until government upgrade dominated and has since brought back 80%. Su, whose organization has soared ahead this year as Intel staggered, is advancing more noteworthy variety and portrayal in her area through a few activities. Also, O'Brien led Apple's COVID reaction in its stores. There are likewise some tech newcomers on the rundown, including Apple natural supervisor Lisa Jackson, most as of late observed up on the top of the organization's spaceship-like central command, and Elon Musk's rocket boss, Gwynne Shotwell (actually president and COO at SpaceX). Other new augmentations are Intel's main variety and consideration official Barbara Whye, Netflix VP Bela Bajaria, and the heads of AT&T and Verizon's business telecom units, Anne Chow and Tami Erwin. I invested some energy profiling one more of the new tech considerations, Amazon VP Alicia Boler Davis. After a youth in Detroit and a long and fruitful profession at General Motors, Boler Davis joined Amazon a year ago to direct the organization's enormous assortment of stockrooms and the multi-hundred-thousand representatives who work in them. At the point when Amazon's initial moves to shield its labor force from COVID were censured, Boler Davis turned rapidly. "At Amazon, there's a high inclination for activity," she let me know. "When you characterize an issue, you move rapidly to discovering arrangements and evaluating various thoughts. And afterward when you discover something that works, you imitate that as fast as could be expected under the circumstances."